Missouri Outdoors

Blue Springs Lake Information

Fishing Information

Blue Springs Lake FishingFishermen know Blue Springs Lake for its beautiful tree-lined shores and a great place to catch fish.  Grab your rod and tackle and enjoy fishing for the following species.

Channel Catfish - 1 to 3 pounds are abundant. Shallow flats and around the dam are your best bet in June. Most anglers agree that fishing right in the rocks of the dam will be necessary to catch large channel catfish or flatheads.  Live fish work better as bait for larger catfish along the dam.  Only rod and reel fishing is allowed.

Hybrid Striped Bass - provide a high quality fishing opportunity at the lake.  The best way to find schools of hybrids is by trolling.  Once fish are located cast deep diving lures or jigging spoons to the area.  In the early spring look for schooling hybrids at the upper end of the lake, near the Lake Jacomo spillway, when water is flowing into Blue Springs Lake.  Fish can also be found along the dam and main lake points in the summer and early fall.  Some of the hottest action every year can be found near the Jacomo discharge pipe (known locally as the "blow hole") especially in the very early morning after moderate rainfalls. Keep an eye out  for hybrids hitting shad on the surface in Marina Cove in early June and on the main lake side of the Woods Chapel bridge most of the season. Reports of fish landed weighing 10 pounds or more were reported last year so leave the ultra-light gear at home.  Over 7,000 young hybrids are stocked annually to provide future fishing opportunities.

Large Mouth Bass - Fish were caught in all size classes last year although the population continues to be low in density.  The population is rebounding with better reproduction documented over the last two years.  Concentrate your efforts along the outside edges of the weed beds and in the fallen timber east of Woods Chapel Road.  Try the drop-offs in the fall on the main lake and the channels in the coves.

Crappie - Black Crappie are abundant but smaller than white crappie.  Anglers report most black crappie are less than 9 inches in length. White crappie have been caught over 12 inches in length.  Fish the standing timber and brush piles during all times of the year except the spawning season. 

Common Carp - A die off in 2012.have lowered numbers. This should improve the fishery for other species, especially largemouth bass in the coming years. Anglers are encouraged to keep the carp they catch.

Walleye - Walleye are becoming a part of this fishery due to the stocking of some surplus fish in 2009 and some overflow from Lake Jacomo. You may catch a walleye while fishing for other species.

Flathead Catfish - This population continues slowly grow.  Fish in the 40 pound plus range are abundant.,  Live bait is a necessity when fishing for large flatheads.  Green sunfish can be caught in the rocks along the dam for bait.  A good location for flatheads is the standing timber alond the edges of the channels

A fish cleaning station is also available at the Blue Springs Lake Marina for their patrons' convenience.

Boat and motor permits are required.

History of Blue Springs Lake

Blue Springs Lake is the smaller of two lakes contained within 7,800-acre Fleming Park.  Reaching full pool in 1990, the 720-acre three-mile long lake lies immediately north of 970-acre Lake Jacomo. 

Blue Springs Lake park complex contains a large number of recreational features that are managed, through a partnership, by Jackson County.  Blue Spring Lake is a part of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Little Blue River Project for flood control, recreation and other water resource development. The family and group picnic shelters set along the northeast shore of Blue Springs Lake make an excellent "home base" for a day at the park.

Move down the western shore and you find a jet-ski landing for your water craft, dry sail for your boat, beach for swimming, one of two marinas and park campgrounds.  One glance at Fleming Park's family-friendly attractions and well-planned amenities, and it will be easy to see why the park is growing in popularity.

Don't forget to pick up your Missouri Fishing License  before heading out